Great Palace of Constantinople

When Constantine I moved the Roman capital to Constantinople in 330, he planned out a palace for himself and his heirs. The palace was located between the Hippodrome and Hagia Sophia. It was rebuilt and expanded several times during its history. Much of the complex was destroyed during the Nika riots of 532 and was rebuilt lavishly by the emperor Justinian I. The mosaics used to decorate the pavement of a peristyle court, dating possibly to the reign of Byzantine emperor Justinian I

 

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A scene from the scroll border of the Great Palace Mosaic, a mosaic floor of scenes of a peristyle court, dating possibly to the reign of Byzantine emperor Justinian I 527 AD-565AD In the wake of the havoc wreaked on the imperial palace on Constantinople's Seraglio Hill during the Nika Revolt,

 

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Emperor Justinian I launched an ambitious program of renovation, which included fitting one of the palace wings with a sumptuous polychrome mosaic floor. Stretching over 1,872 square meters, the tessellated pavement is one of the most beautiful landscape mosaics of late antiquity.