XROMEGOD

Women
the story of rome and CONSTANTINOPLe

romeconstantinopl
Rome & Constantinople

WOMEN IN ROME WERE CITIZENS, but could not vote or hold political office. While Roman women held no direct political power, those from wealthy or powerful families could and did exert influence through private negotiations. Exceptional women who left an undeniable mark on history range from the semi-legendary Lucretia and Claudia Quinta, whose stories took on mythic significance; fierce Republican-era women such as Cornelia, mother of the Gracchi, and Fulvia, who commanded an army and issued coins bearing her image, Livia, great influence on the Imperial first Julio-Claudian dnasty; and the Empress Helena, a driving force in promoting Christianity.

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Octavia the Younger was the elder sister of the first Roman Emperor, Augustus One of the most prominent women in Roman history, Octavia was respected and admired 69 BC – 11 BC

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Empress Livia wife of Augustus

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Empress Livia wife of Augustus

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Empress Livia wife of Augustus

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Empress Livia wife of Augustus

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Empress Livia wife of Augustus

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Empress Livia wife of Augustus

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Empress Livia wife of Augustus

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Empress Livia wife of Augustus

58 BC – 29 AD

After her formal adoption into the Julian family in AD 14 also known as Julia Augusta, was the wife of the Roman emperor Augustus throughout his reign, as well as his adviser. She was the mother of the emperor Tiberius, paternal grandmother of the emperor Claudius, paternal great-grandmother of the emperor Caligula, and maternal great-great-grandmother of the emperor Nero. She was deified by Claudius who acknowledged her title of Augusta
Livia was a long-lived, influential matriarchal figure in the early years of the Roman Principate. She was held up as an example of womanly virtue and simplicity. Her reputation has also been negative: she may have been a murderer, and has been described as treacherous, avaricious, and power-hungry. She may have been instrumental in the banishment of Augustus' daughter, Julia. acknowledged her title of Augusta.
Livia's image evolves with different styles of portraiture that trace her effect on imperial propaganda that helped bridge the gap between her role as wife to the emperor Augustus, to mother of the emperor Tiberius. Becoming more than the "beautiful woman" she is described as in ancient texts, Livia serves as a public image for the idealization of Roman feminine qualities, a motherly figure, and eventually a goddesslike representation that alludes to her virtue.
After Augustus' death, and by his will, she became a priestess in his cult and a member of his family, Julia Augusta.She died at the age of 86.Livia is considered to be an extraordinary female leader and a counterpart to her husband Augustus. Her role remained influential and visible in three generations. Being a role model for other women of the Empire, they all try to be like her and emulate her p
ower.

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Agrippina the Elder wife of Germanicus

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Agrippina the Elder wife of Germanicus

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Agrippina the Elder wife of Germanicus

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Agrippina the Elder wife of Germanicus

4 BC – 33 AD

Daughter of Marcus Agrippa and Julia (who was the daughter of the emperor Augustus), and a major figure in the succession struggles in the latter part of the reign of Tiberius.
Although Tiberius tried to slander her name and reputation, he did not succeed.
Germanicus married his maternal second cousin Agrippina the Elder, a granddaughter of Augustus, between 5 and 1 BC. The couple had six children: Nero Caesar, Drusus Caesar, the Emperor Caligula, the Empress Agrippina the Younger, Julia Drusilla, and Julia Livilla.She was known for many positive things such as her courage and her devotion to her husband and her children.

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Antonia Minor daughter of Octavia & Mark Antony

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Antonia Minor daughter of Octavia & Mark Antony

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Antonia Minor daughter of Octavia & Mark Antony

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Antonia Minor daughter of Octavia & Mark Antony

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Antonia Minor daughter of Octavia & Mark Antony

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Antonia Minor daughter of Octavia & Mark Antony

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Valeria Messalins
the third wife of Claudius

17 / 20 AD – 48 AD

Claudius accession to power, Messalina enters history with a reputation as ruthless, predatory and sexually insatiable. Her husband is represented as easily led by her and unconscious of her many adulteries until informed that she had gone so far as to marry her latest lover, the Senator Gaius Silius in 48
It was claimed that she conspired against her husband and was executed when the plot was discovered.

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Antonia Minor daughter of Octavia & Mark Antony

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36
BC- 37AD

In 16 BC, she married the Roman general and consul Nero Claudius Drusus. Drusus was the stepson of her uncle Augustus, second son of Livia Drusilla and brother of future Emperor Tiberius.

The younger of two daughters of Mark Antony and Octavia Minor.She was a niece of the Emperor Augustus, sister-in-law of the Emperor Tiberius, paternal grandmother of the Emperor Caligula and Empress Agrippina the Younger, mother of the Emperor Claudius, and both maternal great-grandmother and paternal great-aunt of the Emperor Nero. She was additionally the maternal great-aunt of the Empress Valeria Messalina and Faustus Cornelius Sulla Felix, the paternal grandmother of Claudia Antonia, Claudia Octavia, and Britannicus, the grandmother of Caligula and the maternal grandmother of Julia Livia and Tiberius Gemellus.
Drusus died in June 9 BC in Germany, due to complications from injuries he sustained after falling from a horse. After his death, although pressured by her uncle to remarry, she never did.

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Agrippina the Younger
fourth wife of Claudius
mother of Nero

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Agrippina the Younger
fourth wife of Claudius
mother of Nero

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Agrippina the Younger
fourth wife of Claudius
mother of Nero

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Agrippina the Younger
fourth wife of Claudius
mother of Nero

15 AD – 59 AD

Fourth wife of the Emperor Claudius, and mother of the Emperor Nero.

Agrippina the Younger has been described by ancient sources and modern scholars as ruthless, ambitious, violent, and domineering. She was a beautiful and reputable woman and according to Pliny the Elder, she had a double canine in her upper right jaw, a sign of good fortune. Many ancient historians accuse Agrippina of poisoning Emperor Claudius, though accounts vary

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Claudia Octavia

40 AD – 62 AD

First wife of the Emperor Nero

Although she was admired as empress by the Roman citizen body, the marriage was unhappy. Octavia was an ‘aristocratic and virtuous wife'. Nero and Poppaea then banished Octavia to the Campania region, and eventually to the island of Pandateria
Octavia's banishment became so unpopular that the citizens of Rome protested loudly, openly parading through the streets Nero (badly frightened) nearly agreed to remarry Octavia, but instead he signed her death warrant.A few days later, Octavia was bound and her veins were opened in a traditional Roman suicide ritual. She was suffocated in an exceedingly hot vapor bath.

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Poppaea Sabina

30 AD – 65AD

Second wife of the Emperor Nero.

Poppaea Sabina, the young wife of the senator (and later emperor) Otho, and by his fear that his repudiated wife was fomenting disaffection at court
Poppaea pressured Nero to divorce and later execute his first wife and stepsister Claudia Octavia in order to marry Poppaea. Octavia was initially dismissed to Campania, coincidentally the same general geographic area that Pompeii, Poppaea's place of birth, is located. She was then imprisoned on the island of Pandateria (modern Ventotene), a common place of banishment for members of the Imperial family who fell from favor, on a charge of adultery. During his eight-year marriage to Claudia Octavia

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Poppaea Sabina

30 AD – 65AD

Second wife of the Emperor Nero.

He married Poppaea in 62, but she died in 65 described as a beautiful woman who used intrigues to become empress.When Poppaea died in 65, Nero went into deep mourning. Her body was not cremated, it was filled with spices, embalmed, and put in the Mausoleum of Augustus. She was given a state funeral. Nero praised her during the funeral eulogy and gave her divine honors. It is said that Nero burned a year's worth of Arabia's incense production at her funeral

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Poppaea Sabina

30 AD – 65AD

Second wife of the Emperor Nero.

The cause and timing of Poppaea's death is uncertain. According to Suetonius, while she was awaiting the birth of her second child in the summer of 65, she quarreled fiercely with Nero over his spending too much time at the races. In a fit of rage, Nero kicked her in the abdomen, so causing her death
When Poppaea died in 65, Nero went into deep mourning. Her body was not cremated, it was filled with spices, embalmed, and put in the Mausoleum of Augustus. She was given a state funeral. Nero praised her during the funeral eulogy and gave her divine honors. It is said that Nero burned a year's worth of Arabia's incense production at her funeral

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julia daughter of tiTus

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julia daughter of tiTus

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julia daughter of tiTus

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julia daughter of tiTus

64 AD – 91 AD

The daughter and only child to Emperor Titus from his second marriage to the well-connected Marcia Furnilla. Her parents divorced when Julia was an infant, due to her mother's family being connected to the opponents of Roman Emperor Nero. In 65, after the failure of the Pisonian conspiracy, the family of Marcia Furnilla was disfavored by Nero. Julia's father, Titus considered that he didn't want to be connected with any potential plotters and ended his marriage to Marcia Furnilla. Julia was raised by her father. Julia had been born in Rome and Titus conquered Jerusalem on Julia's sixth birthday.
When growing up, Titus offered her in marriage to his brother Domitian, but he refused because of his infatuation with Domitia Longina. Later she married her second paternal cousin T. Flavius Sabinus, brother to consul T. Flavius Clemens, who married her first cousin Flavia Domitilla. By then Domitian had seduced her.Julia seems to have died as a result of a pregnancy (AD 91), after which she was deified, and her ashes placed in the temple of the deified Flavians. Domitian was later buried with her

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Domitia Longina
wife of Domitian

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Domitia Longina
wife of Domitian

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Domitia Longina
wife of Domitian

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Domitia Longina
wife of Domitian

50/55AD – 126/130 AD

Domitia divorced her first husband Lucius Aelius Lamia in order to marry Domitian in 71. The marriage produced only one son, whose early death is believed to have been the cause of temporary rift between Domitia and her husband in 83. She became Empress of Rome upon Domitian's accession in 81, and remained so until his assassination in 96.
Shortly following his accession as Emperor, Domitian bestowed the honorific title of Augusta upon Domitia, while their late son was deified. Both appeared on Domitian's coinage during this time. Nevertheless, the marriage appears to have faced a significant crisis in 83. For reasons unknown, Domitian briefly exiled Domitia, and then soon recalled her,
Twenty-five years after her husband's assassination, and despite the fact that his memory had been damned by the Senate, she still referred to herself as "Domitia, wife of Domitian"
She is believed to have died sometime between 126 and 130.

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Ulpia Marciana
elder sister of Trajan

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Ulpia Marciana
elder sister of Trajan

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Ulpia Marciana
elder sister of Trajan

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Ulpia Marciana
elder sister of Trajan

48 AD – 112.AD

Daughter of the senator Marcus Ulpius Traiana and Marcia, was five years older than her brother, the Emperor Trajan, She and her husband Gaius Saloninus Matidius Patriunus had one child, She was the first sister of a Roman Emperor to receive this title. Marciana did not accept this at first, but her sister-in-law, the Empress Pompeia Plotina, insisted that she take the title. and her statue was placed together with Trajan's and Plotina's over the Arches of Trajan in Ancona. Marciana was very close to Trajan and Plotina.
When Trajan died in 117, Matidia and Plotina brought the emperor's ashes back to Rome. In 119 Matidia died, whereupon the Roman Emperor Hadrian delivered her funeral oration, deified her, and granted her a temple and altar in Rome itself. She thus became the first divinized Roman woman to be dedicated a full-scale temple of her own, as opposed to one shared with her husband or a smaller shrinen Through her daughter Salonina Matidia's third marriage, Marciana was the great-great-great grandmother of future emperor Marcus Aurelius.

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Salonina Matidia
niece of Trajan

68 AD – 119AD

the daughter and only child of Ulpia Marciana Her maternal uncle was the Roman Emperor Trajan. Trajan had no children and treated her like his daughter.Matidia often traveled with her uncle and assisted him with decision-making. Like her mother, Matidia was honored with monuments and inscriptions in her name throughout the Roman Empire. After 105 CE Trajan honored his sister with the title Augusta.

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Salonina Matidia
niece of Trajan

68 AD – 119AD

Her maternal uncle was the Roman Emperor Trajan. Trajan had no children and treated her like his daughter.Matidia often traveled with her uncle and assisted him with decision-making. Like her mother, Matidia was honored with monuments and inscriptions in her name throughout the Roman Empire. After 105 CE Trajan honored his sister with the title Augusta.

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Pompeia Plotina
wife of Trajan

50/68AD – 20/21 AD

Wife of Roman Emperor Trajan. She was renowned for her interest in philosophy, and her virtue, dignity and simplicity. She was particularly devoted to the Epicurean philosophical school in Athens, Greece. Through her influence, she provided Romans with fairer taxation, improved education, assisted the poor, and created tolerance in Roman society.
When Plotina died of illness, c. 121/122, she was deified

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Pompeia Plotina
wife of Trajan

50/68AD – 20/21 AD

Trajan married her before his accession and, although a happy marriage. In 100, Trajan awarded her with title of Augusta, but she did not accept the title until 105. Plotina did not appear also on the coinage until 112.Attianus and Plotina were both present at Trajan’s deathbed in 117, and the two helped secure Hadrian's succession .Along with Attianus and Matidia, the grieving widow Plotina accompanied Trajan’s ashes to Rome.

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Vibia Sabina
wife of Hadrian

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Vibia Sabina
wife of Hadrian

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Vibia Sabina
wife of Hadrian

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Vibia Sabina
wife of Hadrian

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Vibia Sabina
wife of Hadrian

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Vibia Sabina
wife of Hadrian

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Vibia Sabina
wife of Hadrian

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Vibia Sabina
wife of Hadrian

87 AD – 136/137 AD

Roman Empress, wife and second cousin, once removed, to Roman Emperor Hadrian. She was the daughter to Salonina Matidia (niece of Roman Emperor Trajan).She married Hadrian in 100, at the Roman Empress Pompeia Plotina's request, for Hadrian to succeed her great uncle, in 117 Sabina was strong and independent and her beliefs in marriage didn't sit well with the Emperor. Sabina is rumored to have had an affair with Suetonius, a historian who was Hadrian's secretary
She endured poor relations with her husband, though she appears on many of his coins. 128, she was awarded the title of Augusta. Vibia Sabina died before her husband, some time in 136 or early 137

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faustina the elder
wife of Antoninus Pius

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faustina the elder
wife of Antoninus Pius

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faustina the elder
wife of Antoninus Pius

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faustina the elder
wife of Antoninus Pius

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faustina the elder
wife of Antoninus Pius

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faustina the elder
wife of Antoninus Pius

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faustina the elder
wife of Antoninus Pius

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faustina the elder
wife of Antoninus Pius

about 100 AD – 140AD

As a private citizen, she married Antoninus Pius . Faustina and Antoninus had a very happy marriage. Faustina bore Antoninus four children, two sons and two daughters. Faustina became Roman Empress and the Senate accorded her the title of Augusta.Faustina was well respected, especially for her charity work. She enjoyed a happy marriage to Antoninus which lasted 31 years until her death in AD 141. In her memory, Antoninus formally deified her as a goddess.
Faustina was a beautiful woman, well known for her wisdom. She spent her whole life caring for the poor and assisting the most disadvantaged Romans. Although she died twenty years before him, Antoninus Pius did not remarry.
A temple in Rome was begun in 141 AD by the Emperor Antoninus Pius and was initially dedicated to his deceased and deified wife, Faustina the Elder. When Antoninus Pius was deified after his death in 161 AD, the temple was re-dedicated jointly to Antoninus and Faustina at the instigation of his successor, Marcus Aurelius.

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Faustina the Younger wife of Marcus Aurelius

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Faustina the Younger wife of Marcus Aurelius

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Faustina the Younger wife of Marcus Aurelius

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Faustina the Younger wife of Marcus Aurelius

125/130 AD – 175 AD

Annia Galeria Faustina Minor (Minor Latin for the Younger), Faustina Minor or Faustina the Younger was a daughter of Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius and Roman Empress Faustina the Elder. She was a Roman Empress and wife to her maternal cousin Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius.
Faustina was reported to have been overcome with passion for a certain gladiator, and that her son Commodus was the product of this union and not her marriage with the emperor. At any rate, the empress was well-known for her passions, particularly for low-life sailors and gladiators

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Faustina the Younger wife of Marcus Aurelius

125 /130 AD - 175AD

Empress Faustina the Younger, wife of Marcus Aurelius, from Tarsos (Asia Minor), mid 2nd century AD,Though Roman sources give a generally negative view of her character, she was held in high esteem by soldiers and her own husband and was given divine honours after her death.

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Faustina the Younger wife of Marcus Aurelius

125 /130 AD - 175AD

Faustina bore Marcus at least 12 children, of whom 6—5 daughters and 1 son, Commodus—survived her. Because she accompanied her husband as he fought the tribes along the Danube, Marcus had her proclaimed “mother of the camp” (mater castrorum)

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Bruttia Crispina,
wife of Commodus

164AD - 191AD

After ten years of marriage, Crispina was falsely charged with adultery by her husband and was banished to the island of Capri in 188, where she was later executed. After her banishment, Commodustook on a mistress, a woman named Marcia, who was later said to have murder

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Bruttia Crispina,
wife of Commodus

164 AD - 191AD

Upon her marriage, Crispina received the title of Augusta,and thus became empress of the Roman Empire, as her husband was co-emperor with her father-in-law at the time. The previous empress and her mother-in-law, Faustina the Younger had died three years prior to her arrival.

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Julia domna wife of Septimius Severus

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Julia domna wife of Septimius Severus

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Julia domna wife of Septimius Severus

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Julia domna wife of Septimius Severus

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Julia domna wife of Septimius Severus

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Julia domna wife of Septimius Severus

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Julia domna wife of Septimius Severus

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Julia domna wife of Septimius Severus

170 AD – 217 AD

Julia Domna played an important role as center of circle of Roman and Greek philosophers and sophists, including Philostratus . If it were not for Julia, we would have very little information today about the legendary Apollonius of Tyana. It was at the behest of Julia that Philostratus wrote his now famous Life of Apollonius.
She was the youngest daughter of the high-priest to Syro-Roman sun god. cult. Gaius Julius Bassianus and her eldest sister was Julia Maesa.Julia Domna's sister Julia Maesa, who later took over the role of Matriarch of the Severan household also had a profound influence on the politics of the Roman Empire during the decade following Julia Domna's death.

FulviaPlautillawifeofCaracalla

Fulvia Plautilla
wife of Caracalla

185 AD – 212AD

Severus and Plautianus arranged for Plautilla and Caracalla to be married in April 202. The forced marriage proved to be very unhappy; After her father was condemned for treachery and his family properties were confiscated. she was exiled and eventually killed on Caracalla's orders. treated very harshly and were eventually strangled on Caracalla's orders,

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Fulvia Plautilla
wife of Caracalla

185 AD – 212AD

Severus and Plautianus made sure that his daughter was well-educated. Her marriage to the crown prince was important, not just for her father's career, but also for the emperor, who wanted to end the opposition between his family and the prefect by creating a shared interest.

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Furia Sabinia Tranquillina wife of Gordian III Emperor

225AD – 244 AD

The Empress of Rome and wife of Emperor Gordian III. Like other empresses before her - Fulvia Plautilla - was an instrument in the hands of his fatherGreatly loved by her husband, she survived his assassination, possibly due to her immense popularity with both the general population and the soldiery.

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Furia Sabinia Tranquillina wife of Gordian III Emperor

225AD – 244 AD

She was the young daughter of the Praetorian Prefect Timesitheus Her marriage to Gordian was an admission by the young emperor of both Timesitheus' political indispensability and Tranquillina’s suitability as an empress.Following the death of both her father and her husband in 244, her fate remains unknown.

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Julia Mamaea mother of Alexander Severus

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Julia Mamaea mother of Alexander Severus

cJuliaAvitaMamaea14or29Augustafter180235wasaRomanregentShewasthemotherofRomanEmperorAlexanderSeverusjpg

Julia Mamaea mother of Alexander Severus

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Julia Mamaea mother of Alexander Severus

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Julia Mamaea mother of Alexander Severus

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Julia Mamaea mother of Alexander Severus

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Unknown women
100 AD– AD 300?

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Julia Mamaea mother of Alexander Severus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


180 AD – 235 AD

A powerful Roman woman of Syrian origin and Syrian noble Gaius Julius Avitus Alexianus. She was a niece of empress Julia Domna; emperor Lucius Septimius Severus and sister of Julia Soaemias Bassiana.As a member of the Imperial Roman family, she watched closely the death of her cousin Caracalla and the ascent to power of her nephew Elagabalus, the oldest grandson of Julia Maesa and her choice to the throne
Julia was reported to be a virtuous woman, never involved in scandals. Julia was attentive to the education of her son, Alexander, whom she prepared adequately for becoming emperor of Rome. Alexander thought much of his mother's advice and followed what she said

OtaciliaSeveraWIFEOFPHILIPTHEARAB

Otacillia Severa
wife of Phillp the arab

244 AD – 249 AD

Otacilia Severa was the Empress of Rome and wife of Emperor Marcus Julius Philippus or Philip the Arab, who reigned over the Roman Empire. In 234, Severa married Philip who at that time probably served in the Praetorian Guard under Emperor Alexander Severus and they had three children: Philip gave Severa the title of Augusta and had their son made heir .

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JOtacillia Severa
wife of Phillp the arab

244 AD – 249 AD

Severa and Philip are generally considered as the first Christian imperial couple, because during their reign the persecutions of Christians had ceased and the couple had become tolerant towards Christianism but their beliefs has not been proven. It was through her intervention, for instance, that Bishop and Saint Babylas of Antioch was saved from persecution.

aAnniaCupresseniaHerenniaEtruscillaAugustawifeofTrajanDeciusEmperor249251motherofEmperorsHerenniusEtruscusandHostilian

Annia Cupressenia Herennia Etruscilla of wife of Decius

249 AD – 251 AD

Herennia Etruscilla was a member of the Italian aristocracy. She married Decius and gave birth to Quintus Herennius Decius and Gaius Valens Hostilianus (known as Herennius Etruscus and Hostilian). Her name also appears Herannia.

AnniaCupresseniaHerenniaEtruscillaAugustawifeofTrajanDeciusEmperor249251motherofEmperorsHerenniusEtruscusandHostilian

Annia Cupressenia Herennia Etruscilla of wife of Decius

249 AD – 251 AD

Annia Cupressenia Herennia Etruscilla was Augusta wife of Emperor Decius, and mother of Emperors Herennius Etruscus and Hostilian .Very little is known about her. Probably of senatorial family, she became regent on her son Hostilian, when Decius and Herennius were defeated and killed in the Battle of Abrittus she sank into obscurity after her husband and sons perished.

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Galeria Valeria Eutropiacius wife of Maximian Hercules

249 AD – 326 AD

Eutropia was of Syrian extraction and her marriage to Maximianus Herculius seems to have been her second. She bore him two children: Maxentius who was Western Roman Emperor from 306–312 and Fausta. An older daughter, Theodora, may have been a product of her first marriage. Fausta became the wife of Constantine I . She apparently survived all her children, with the possible exception of her daughter Fausta who seems to have died in 326, and was alive in 325. She is also said to have become a Christian.

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Valeria Maximilla wife of Maxentius

293 AD -312 AD

Valeria Maximilla (fl. 293–312) was the Empress of Rome and wife of Emperor Maxentius.

She was the daughter of Emperor Galerius and his first wife, whose name is unknown. She married Maxentius around 293 (the exact date is unknown) in what was likely an attempt to forge an alliance between the families of Galerius and Maxentius' father Maximian, himself Emperor in the West. She bore two sons:

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Flavia Maxima Fausta first wife of Constinine I

289 AD -326 AD

Empress Fausta was held in high esteem by Constantine, and proof of his favour was that in 323 she was proclaimed Augusta .However three years later Fausta was put to death by Constantine, following the execution of Crispus, his eldest son by Minervina, in 326. The two deaths have been inter-related in various ways; in one, Fausta is set jealously against Crispus, as in the anonymous Epitome de Caesaribus, or conversely her adultery. Fausta was executed by suffocation in an over-heated bath

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Flavia Maxima Fausta first wife of Constinine I

289 AD -326 AD

Flavia Maxima Fausta was a Roman Empress, daughter of the Roman Emperor Maximianus. To seal the alliance between them for control of the Tetrarchy, in 307 Maximianus married her to Constantine I, who set aside his wife Minervina in her favour. As the sister of Emperor Maxentius, Fausta had a part in her father's downfall. In 310 Maximian died as a consequence of an assassination plot against Constantine. Maximian decided to involve his daughter Fausta, but she revealed the plot to her husband

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Helena Mother of Emperor Constantine I

249 AD – 326 AD

Was the Wife of the Roman emperor Constantius Chlorus and the mother of the emperor Constantine the Great, an important figure in the history of Christianity. She is traditionally credited with a pilgrimage to Syria Palaestina, during which she discovered the True Cross of Jesus's crucifixion. She is revered as a saint by the Eastern and Oriental Orthodox

AeliaGallaPlacidia38827November450daughteroftheRomanemperorTheodosiusIwasregenttoValentinianIIIfrom423untilhismajorityin43GalliaPlacidia1

Aelia Galla Placidia daughter of Theodosius I

388 AD -450AD

Aelia Galla Placidia daughter of the Roman emperor Theodosius I, was regent to Valentinian III from 423 until his majority in 43 Gallia Placidia and a major force in Roman politics for most of her life. Prior to the fall of Rome, Placidia was captured by Alaric. She followed the Visigoths in their move from the Italian Peninsula to Gaul in 412. She was queen consort to Ataulf, king of the Goths from 414 until his death in 415, and briefly empress consort to Constantius III in 421.

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Empress Placidia wife of emperor Olybrius

439 AD - 480'sAD .

Olybrius married Placidia, younger daughter of Western Emperor Valentinian III and his wife Licinia Eudoxia, thus creating a bond between a member of the senatorial aristocracy and the House of Theodosius.Placidia was the second daughter of Valentinian III and Licinia Eudoxia. Both were named for their grandmothers: Eudocia for the maternal, Aelia Eudocia, and Placidia for the paternal, Galla Placidia is estimated to have been born between 439 and 443.Placidia was probably the last Western Roman Empress known by name.Placidia is last mentioned c. 484

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Licinia Eudoxia wife of emperor Valentinan III

422 AD -462AD

A Roman Empress, daughter of Eastern Emperor Theodosius II and wife of the Western Emperors Valentinian III and Petronius Maximus.It later was claimed that it was she who invited the Vandal Geiseric to Rome in the same year. After the ensuing sack, she and her two daughters were carried back to Carthage. It was not until the early 460s that she and Placidia were set free, and withdrew to Constantinople, where she spent the remainder of her years. Licinia dauther Eudocia remained in Africa as the wife of Geiseric's son Huneric.

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Empress Ariane Empress wife of emperors Zeno & Anastasius I

454 AD -515 0AD

Aelia Ariadne was the Empress consort of Zeno (emperor) and Anastasius I (emperor) Ariadne was a daughter of Leo I (emperor) and Verina Her mother was a sister of Basiliscus On 18 January 474, Leo I died of dysentery His grandson immediately succeeded him, Leo II AD 474 Since Leo II was too young to rule himself, Ariadne and her mother Verina prevailed upon him to crown Zeno as co-emperor, which he did on February 9 474. When Leo became ill and died on November 17, Zeno became sole emperor, with Ariadne as empress consort.

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Empress Ariane Empress wife of emperors Zeno & Anastasius I

454 AD -515 0AD

She remained married to Zeno to his death on 9 April 491. The widowed Augusta was able to choose his successor for the throne and a second husband for herself in the person of Anastasius I a palace official whom she preferred to Longinus (consul 486) Zenos brother. Anastasius was proclaimed Emperor on 11 April and they were married on 20 May Anastasius AD 491-518 Their marriage remained childless.

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unknown women

80 AD -300AD

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Empress Ariane Empress wife of emperors Zeno & Anastasius I

454 AD -515 0AD

The widowed Augusta was able to choose his successor for the throne and a second husband for herself in the person of Anastasius, a palace official (silentiarius), whom she preferred to Longinus, Zeno's brother. Anastasius was proclaimed Emperor on 11 April and they were married on 20 May. She died in Constantinople in 515 and was buried in the Church of the Holy Apostles Anastasius was buried besides her in 510

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unknown women

80 AD -200AD

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unknown women

80 AD -200AD

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unknown women

80 AD -200AD

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unknown women

80 AD -200AD

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Claudia Olympias, daughter of Tiberius, Epithymetus

110 AD -130AD

Who died aged 49 and a half years after 33 years of marriage.Her freedman (set this up)Her coiffure is typical of the late Trajanic and early Hadrianic period

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Cornelia Antonia from Pisidia

180 AD -200AD

A beautiful classical roman statue of a woman Cornelia Antonia in luminous marble from Antioch of Pisidia, Turkey

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unknown women

80 AD -300AD

u8272FemaleportraitwithcrowntheColosseum

unknown women

200 AD -300AD

272 Female portrait with crown, the Colosseum